End-of-life care and pragmatic decision making a bioethical perspective by D. Micah Hester

Cover of: End-of-life care and pragmatic decision making | D. Micah Hester

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, New York .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Terminal care -- Moral and ethical aspects,
  • Terminal care -- Decision making,
  • Terminal Care -- ethics,
  • Bioethical Issues,
  • Decision Making -- ethics,
  • Palliative Care -- ethics

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Book details

StatementD. Micah Hester.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsR726.8 .H475 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationp. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23980174M
ISBN 109780521113809, 9780521130738
LC Control Number2009020441

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End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making provides a pragmatic philosophical framework based on a radically empirical attitude toward life and death. Micah Hester takes seriously the complexities of experiences and argues that when making end-of-life decisions healthcare providers ought to pay close attention to the narratives of Cited by: 8.

End-of-life care and pragmatic decision making: a bioethical perspective. [D Micah Hester] This book provides a pragmatic philosophical framework based on a radically empirical attitude toward life and death.

# Terminal care--Decision making\/span>\n \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n schema. In End of life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective, D. Micah Hester, who states in his introduction that he experienced the death of his daughter born prematurely and untouched by his hands, speaks of what he knows about decision making at the end of life.

In the introductory chapter, he observes—and I think many readers would agree—that for dying patients Author: Stephen R. Workman. End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making A Bioethical Perspective End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making provides a philosophi-cal framework based on a radically empirical attitude toward life and death.

Micah Hester takes seriously the complexities of experiences, and argues that when making end-of-life decisions. In any case, as soon as it is clear that the patient is nearing the end of life, the family should try to discuss with the medical team which end-of-life care approach they want for their family member.

That way, decision making for crucial situations can be planned and. Every one of us will die, and the processes we go through will be our own - unique to our own experiences and life stories. End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making provides a pragmatic philosophical framework based on a radically empirical attitude toward life and death.

end-of-life: Cardiac pacing noun The point at which a pacemaker signals a need for replacement, as its battery is nearing depletion. Medspeak adjective Referring to a final period (hours, days, weeks, months) in a person’s life, in which it is medically obvious that death is imminent or a terminal moribund state cannot be prevented.

As in. Get this from a library. End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: a Bioethical Perspective. [D Micah Hester] -- Provides a pragmatic philosophical framework based on a radically empirical attitude toward life and death.

about end-of-life treatments before illness strikes. This guide is designed to explain the moral principles of Catholic teaching with regard to end-of-life decision-making and to outline the options that exist in New York State for advance care Size: KB.

End-of-Life Care And Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective. By D. Micah Hester. Cambrige: Cambridge University Press, Pp. $ [REVIEW] [author unknown] - - William James Studies End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making Article in Journal of palliative medicine 15(2) February DOI: /jpm Source: PubMed.

end-of-life decisions should respect the person’s values and wishes while maintaining his or her comfort and dignity. The Alzheimer’s Association® can help you prepare for making end-of-life decisions, such as:» Advocating for care that is based on the expressed wishes of the person with Size: 1MB.

A New Objective of Advance Care Planning Focused on Preparation for in-the-Moment Decision-Making. Given the problems with the pre-specification of treatment preferences, we propose that the main objective of advance care planning be to prepare patients and surrogates to participate with clinicians in making the best possible in-the-moment by: As you face aging and the need to make plans for your future, you face having to make decisions about many aspects of your lives.

These legal and health care decisions not only protect you from others making decisions for your care that you do not want, they also protect family and loved ones by giving them guidance in the care that you would like to receive.

The book addresses common barriers to advance care planning and offers ways to overcome them, as well as detailing public health, legal, and comprehensive community planning approaches to change how our current American society deals with dying, death, and end-of-life care.5/5(2).

Options and decision-making at end of life If you are approaching the end of life, or you care for someone who is, there are a number of options for care under Canada's current laws. Learn about these options and how you can help make sure that treatment is consistent.

These instructions fall under the general category of "end-of-life care decision making." Depending on the state in which you live, this may take the form of a health care proxy, a medical directive, a living will, or a combination of these. Larson DG, Tobin DR.

End-of-life conversations: evolving practice and theory. JAMA. ; 8. Balaban RB. A physician’s guide to talking about end Cited by: 7. End-of-Life Care and Decision-Making - Guidelines Summary These guidelines set out a process for reaching end-of-life decisions.

This process promotes communication among the treating team and with patients and families. A REVIEW ON THE END-OF-LIFE CARE AND PRAGMATIC DECISION MAKING: A BIOETHICAL PERSPECTIVE D.

Micah Hester’s book End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective is a reviving examination of good issues encompassing look after the withering utilizing what he calls a profoundly experimental logic vigorously obliged to William James.

Pragmatic ethics theory of ethical principles pales next to ethical pragmatism, a real life pragmatism philosophy that deals with pragmatic principles. Plato would regard ethical pragmatism as the utilitarianism of doers as distinguished from pragmatic ethics which is merely theoretical.

Ethical pragmatism is a blueprint for living. It can be used for the betterment of life right now and for. National Health Care Decisions Day takes on a new significance this year as COVID sweeps critical illness and death across the country. With demand for hospice and palliative care services on the rise amid the pandemic, providers are adopting new strategies to highlight the benefits of advance care planning for patients and families.

The experience of a patient at end of life is marked not only by the symptoms suffered, but also by other factors, such as the actions and decisions regarding treatment taken by the professionals attending the patient [1, 2].From a palliative point of view, in the final days, one must consider a decision-making method that has patient comfort as its primary objective and that manages Cited by: 9.

10 Must Reads About Death and End-Of-Life Care organizer designed to allow your family members the freedom to grieve in the days following your death rather than making a million decisions. End of life decisions are carefully recorded in advance lifting the responsibility and perhaps subsequent controI wish we would have had this in place.

Involving nursing home patients and their relatives in end-of-life care conversations and treatment decisions has recently gained increased importance in several Western countries.

However, there is little knowledge about how the patients themselves and their next-of-kin look upon involvement in end-of-life care decisions. The purpose of this paper is to explore nursing home patients’ and Cited by: medical directive: a general term for documents that provide direction on the type of care a person desires.

See also advance directive, living will. A pragmatic 4-step approach to discussing end-of-life care is outlined in Table 1. The physician sensitively initiates the discussion so as to create a forum for ongoing dialogue. Subsequent discussion serves to clarify prognosis, identify end-of-life goals, and finally to develop a treatment by: a review on the end-of-life care and pragmatic decision making: a bioethical perspective D.

Micah Hester’s book End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective is a reviving examination of good issues encompassing look after the withering utilizing what he calls a profoundly experimental logic vigorously obliged to.

End-of-Life Decisions highlights the special role that psychiatrists play as patients make decisions near the end of their lives; from treating the conditions that impair patients’ decision making, to dealing with family dynamics in choices to withhold care, to overcoming obstacles to meaningful communication between doctors and patients.

Treatment and care towards the end of life: good practice in decision making Patients coming to the end of their lives need high quality care and treatment. Providing this care is likely to involve making difficult and emotionally challenging decisions.

Reconsidering Care Preferences. It is not always easy to navigate all of your choices during the course of your treatment, or especially to make decisions about end-of-life care. This examination of end-of-life decision making offers a broader perspective than that found in the extensive existing literature on this topic by offering a cross-national comparison.

Experts from twelve countries analyze death-related issues and policies in their respective nations, discussing such topics as health care costs, advance directives or wills, pain management, and cultural. Important Aspects of Communicating with End-of Life Patients and How Nurses Can Facilitate the Process Words | 3 Pages.

Important Aspects of Communicating with End-of Life Patients and How Nurses Can Facilitate the Process End of life decision-making is often a very difficult process and one that every person will eventually have to go through at some point in their lives.

for end-of-life care, but those consequences are beyond the scope of this paper. Notwithstanding the ubiquity of state statutes directing the surrogate decision maker to con-sider religious/moral beliefs, the legal issues involving end-of-life care and religion have been studied little.

The definitive article is File Size: KB. Those involved in end-of-life decision making must take into account both legal and ethical issues.

This book starts with a critical reflection of ethical principles including ideas such as moral status, the value of life, acts and omissions, harm, autonomy, dignity and by: 5. end-of-life definition: 1. End-of-life issues relate to someone's death and the time just before it, when it is known that.

Learn more. The book is organized into two parts. Part I provides the historical and ethical considerations in end-of-life care. Part II introduces the reader to a practical clinical tool, the Goals of Care Assessment Tool (GCAT), which is skillfully illuminated in each chapter.

This synthesis of knowledge and pragmatism can be called phronesis, or Cited by: 1. Issues in end-of-life care include confusion and conflict over decision-making, poor patient–clinician communication, insufficient pain and symptom relief, and.

End-of-life decision-making is a sensitive but important aspect of end-of-life care that can have a significant impact on the process of dying and dying patients’ comfort in the last days of. End of Life Decisions, the Law and Clinical Practice Information for NSW health practitioners.

Decision making at end of life. Print A A. professionals work collaboratively with each other and with their patients and their families throughout all phases of end of life care. The public guardian has just been granted healthcare decision making power for Ms. Long, a 78 year-old woman with severe dementia, diabetes with impaired vision, and poor kidney function, recent recurrent pneumonia, and prior strokes.

You are seeing her for. End-of-life medical decisions and the decision-making process were explored in the middle part of the questionnaire after questions about the end-of-life context (characteristics of the deceased person, physician, place of death, whether palliative care had been provided).Cited by:   Until now, studies on end-of-life decision making have mainly focused on adults and newborn infants.

In these patient groups, end-of-life care frequently involves end-of-life decisions (ELDs), that is, decisions that, whether intentionally or otherwise, hasten death. A recent study in 6 European countries showed that ELDs played a role in 23% to 51% of all deaths.

3 In the Netherlands Cited by:

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